What 3 years at Warwick has taught me about university – OurWarwick
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What 3 years at Warwick has taught me about university

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (the)
Abigail Booth | English Language and Linguistics with Intercalated year Contact Abigail

Earlier this week, I received my final university results. It has since been dawning on me that this is the end of my undergraduate Warwick experience! Whilst this is definitely upsetting, I thought I’d take this blog as a chance to look back on what this amazing experience has taught me.

A passion for your subject is one of the most important things – university is not always smooth sailing, but I found that all the hard work, endless hours and stress was worth it because, ultimately, I loved my degree.

You won’t love every aspect of your degree – after saying the above, of course, there will be some modules you dislike with a passion, but also, others that you love, and that you can’t wait to delve further into.

You will undoubtedly make friends for life – as soppy as this may sound, I really have made some friends who know me better than some friends that I have known since I was a child, from my hometown. There’s something about being around people at such a close proximity, whether you’re living with them, or seeing them most days on campus, that really strengthens a friendship. Being a university student has ups and downs, and you can share the good and the bad moments with these people, and form bonds for life.

There IS more to life than just academics – now, this is quite rich coming from me, someone who is constantly worrying about grades, but, when I look back over my time at Warwick, I’m delighted (and a bit relieved) to think of the extracurricular activities I’ve taken part in, the hilarious nights out, and the days spent exploring the local areas.

You’ll come out of it a new person – the university experience has honestly transformed me from a teen/young adult, to an adult. The independence that comes with living alone, being responsible for your own studying, and how you spend your time, with nobody there to tell you what’s the right thing (of course, support is available!), I feel like I’m so much more confident and assured that I can be a successful adult, even if the real world does still seem a bit scary.

You’ll also find out who you are – I know how cliché this sounds, believe me. But I feel incredibly lucky to have found my true passions at university, whether that be within my subject or in extracurricular activities. The amazing thing about going to university is that you are provided with opportunities to find out what you like to do, and the kind of person that you are.

Saying goodbye is hard – to staff members, to friends, to the secure bubble of university life on campus – it isn’t easy letting all of this go after 3 years!

Perhaps most importantly, university has taught me that while validation from others feels good, you should be your own number 1 fan. Make decisions that are right for you – this does not mean be completely selfish all of the time, but some of the time, this is completely ok. You’re in charge of your future, no one else’s!

Thanks for reading 🙂

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (the)
Abigail Booth | English Language and Linguistics with Intercalated year Contact Abigail

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