Tips for Studying for Exams – OurWarwick
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Tips for Studying for Exams

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (the)
Dom Thornton | Film Studies Contact Dom
When i'm not studying film as part of my degree,…
Find out more about me Contact Dom

Well it’s time. Yes, Term 3 is finally here. Though while my previous blog post detailed all the exciting things that Term 3 will offer due to campus reopening and hugs now becoming legal – I’ve already enjoyed my first drink back at The Dirty Duck, and my, what a feeling it was. It was also pouring it down with rain, but then again this is Britain, drinks in the rain is just a natural part of life, and at the very least you might as well follow Natasha Bedingfield’s advice and “feel the rain on your skin” – I may have failed to mention a teeny tiny bit of important information for any student during Term 3: exams.

The first thing about this part of the university experience is, I’ve never done exams before (at least outside of school). With Covid cancelling all exams for first years last year, I personally had a huge relief of prime relaxation this time last year, that is when I was ignoring the huge, unprecedented event that was occurring outside. So so far, Term 3 and exams has been a huge shift. Having revision sessions online with tutors has been super helpful, with lengthy sessions designed to go over topics that have been learnt and to give a refresher of anything that may have been forgotten. The shift to online open book exams is a rather daunting notion, yet the thought of it being new to everyone gives me a slight sense of ease. With these things in mind, here are perhaps a few tips, from one first time uni exam student, to coping with the build up to exams.

Don’t Panic:

Ok, I’m stealing this one from that early 2000s sketch comedy Bruiser, whereupon Robert Webb and Charlotte Hudson would parody BBC Bitesize. Yet “don’t Panic” is relatively excellent advice for any situation. For exams, the same stands true – “Don’t Panic”.

Create a Schedule:

Now I’m not suggesting timetabling your entire existence for the next few weeks, but scheduling time to study will really help keep you focused and will make sure revision actually gets done. I often find starting is the hardest part, so if you schedule yourself to start, the rest of the work should flow like a tap.

Study With Friends:

This one’s mileage might vary depending on who you’re friends with, but I’ve often found meeting and talking with friends about topics that may appear on an exam to be super helpful in developing my understanding, and also helping my confidence in relation to answering and discussing possible questions.

Take a Break:

Use this tip with discipline, but most importantly, do take a break. Cramming mountains of revision on top of each won’t do you or your brain any good, so make sure, once sufficient work and regions has been completed, to take a break. Use this time for a hobby, maybe stick on a film, whatever takes your fancy to relax your mind.

I am once again going to reuse my classic sign off used throughout the past year, though hopefully it resonate with a different meaning and feeling. To quote Boethius, “history is a wheel. “Inconstancy is my very essence,” says the wheel. “Good times pass away, but then so do the bad. Mutability is our tragedy, but it’s also our hope. The worst of times, like the best, are always passing away.” Just think how happy you’ll be once exams are over and you’ve done really well. Good luck with your exams

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (the)
Dom Thornton | Film Studies Contact Dom
When i'm not studying film as part of my degree,…
Find out more about me Contact Dom

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