Procrastination and Me. – OurWarwick
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Procrastination and Me.

Dunya Simoes | Politics and Sociology (Warwick Scholar) Contact Dunya
Please feel free to ask me about anything!
Find out more about me Contact Dunya

I am someone who has struggled A LOT with procrastination. I still do, at times. It is a constant battle for me and it has been for a long time in my academic career. Though, I am definitely better. And this is because I realised that procrastination was majorly harming myself and my wellbeing – while I was still able to achieve adequate grades doing my work last-minute, my well-being would be far from adequate. The stress and anxiety I put myself under is not great, simply put.

I am certain I am not alone when it comes to the issue of procrastination. It is likely that you clicked on this blog because you too struggle with it. Now, I could list some practical tips and tricks on how to tackle procrastination and practice better time-management. Although, I have found that not to be extraordinarily effective because we all technically know how not to. Instead, I analysed as to WHY I have the tendency to do so.

The principal thing to realise is that procrastination can be, and typically is, a form of self-sabotage. Though the reasons for each person to do so can vary, we are all ultimately self-sabotaging ourselves as we know it would be 100 times better to complete our work within a more suitable timeframe so as not to undergo a tonne of stress. Nevertheless, I do know some people work better under time constraints and believe they need that pressure to produce good pieces of work – but this is for those like myself who know they’d be helping themselves if they did not allow themselves to leave it so late. And so, this is why I concluded that procrastination can be a form of self-sabotage when I know that I am not the type of student that can easily handle such pressure.

While it was simple to identify it was self-sabotage, it was by no means simple to prevent myself from doing it. I found that I had to dig deeper and think as to WHY I may self-sabotage. With the help of Google, I began to research the causes for self-sabotaging behaviour and found that one particular reason really resonated with me.

Low self-worth/self-esteem. I concluded that, in a way, I felt I was undeserving or ‘incapable’ of (academic) success because I was not particularly confident in my academic abilities. In turn, this causes me to subconsciously self-sabotage myself and almost set myself up for failure by not giving myself enough time. I was able to make this conclusion as I realised that whenever I receive good grades, I felt overly shocked (of course, humbleness is crucial!) and almost like a fraud – like it must be a mistake and it is ‘impossible’ that I received such a grade. The solution? I realised I needed to believe in myself more. While I am not encouraging anyone to be arrogant or complacent. it is important to believe that you CAN do it and to try your best always (I know, how cheesy). I stopped making self-deprecating comments all the time (no matter how humorous) and when receiving good grades, began to say to myself “Well done Dunya, you deserve it because of the hard work you put in”.

If you struggle with procrastination like me, I strongly encourage you to take a step back and think WHY you do this to yourself. Even me writing this blog has enabled me to think more about my procrastinating actions and consequences thus allowing me to reflect further. I have found that this is the best method to stop yourself from procrastinating as it is essentially a journey of self-reflection. You are getting to the root of the problem rather than glossing over the surface by just telling yourself to try better next time. I truly hope this can help someone!

Dunya Simoes | Politics and Sociology (Warwick Scholar) Contact Dunya
Please feel free to ask me about anything!
Find out more about me Contact Dunya

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